Videos & Podcasts

Videos & Podcasts

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When you feel stressed, it is often because there is so much competing for your time and attention. Feeling out of control is one of the greatest threats of all to the human brain. Here’s a quick activity to take back control.  Make a list of everything that's causing you stress. Go through that list and cross off everything for which you have no control. Of the things that are in your control, pick one and ask yourself the following questions:  Is this a problem that I can solve?
Is there an action that I can take?
Is it an emotion I can just let myself feel?
Is it a thought I can reframe?  So much of our stress comes from worrying about things beyond our control. It's normal. Our brain doesn't like uncertainty, so it's natural for us to do that, but we can take back control. We can use our mind to change our brain.  One easy way to do that is to focus on something very specific that's in your control.  ----------------  Subscribe to the Anne Grady Group for more resilience-building tools and strategies! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU8s....  ----------------  Sign up for Anne's weekly Resilience Reset email list! 
https://www.annegradygroup.com/strong...  ----------------  More at https://www.annegradygroup.com​​​​​
▶︎ Instagram: @AnneGradyGroup
▶︎ Twitter: @AnneGradyGroup
▶︎ Facebook: Anne Grady Group
▶︎ New Book + Companion Journal: https://www.annegradygroup.com/books/...
Are you in control?

When you feel stressed, it is often because there is so much competing for your time and attention. Feeling out of control is one of the greatest threats of all to the human brain. Here’s a quick activity to take back control.

Make a list of everything that's causing you stress. Go through that list and cross off everything for which you have no control. Of the things that are in your control, pick one and ask yourself the following questions:

Is this a problem that I can solve?
Is there an action that I can take?
Is it an emotion I can just let myself feel?
Is it a thought I can reframe?

So much of our stress comes from worrying about things beyond our control. It's normal. Our brain doesn't like uncertainty, so it's natural for us to do that, but we can take back control. We can use our mind to change our brain.

One easy way to do that is to focus on something very specific that's in your control.

----------------

Subscribe to the Anne Grady Group for more resilience-building tools and strategies! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU8s....

----------------

Sign up for Anne's weekly Resilience Reset email list!
https://www.annegradygroup.com/strong...

----------------

More at https://www.annegradygroup.com​​​​​
▶︎ Instagram: @AnneGradyGroup
▶︎ Twitter: @AnneGradyGroup
▶︎ Facebook: Anne Grady Group
▶︎ New Book + Companion Journal: https://www.annegradygroup.com/books/...

YouTube Video UExTZERTdG9fZ2VxQnF0bnBPUmNXMzMyZjRaRFdqdzdIYi4zQTkzRjgxRTY0OEU0MkM3

Are you in control?

September 28, 2023 1:53 pm

We all know one. A person who just isn’t very nice or one that is perpetually difficult. This person can be a colleague, someone that works at your doctor’s office, or even a family member. (Truth bomb: If you don’t know this person, it could be you 😉).  Here’s the thing, most people don’t wake up and think, “I want to be difficult and unkind today”. We all want to be loved and to have a sense of belonging. It is a basic human need. No one aims to be disliked or excluded.  When people are rude, difficult, overbearing, or just plain mean, try to remember the following:  Hurt people hurt people. It’s not an excuse, but it is an explanation and one that allows us to see people through a lens of compassion instead of judgment. You can still be frustrated, you can create distance between yourself and this person, or can choose to not have them in your life.  We behave like the person we think we are. It is impossible to behave in a way that is inconsistent with the way we see ourselves. If someone has self-hatred or isn’t happy, they will behave that way toward others, often unintentionally. We have blindspots when it comes to our behavior, and often our intent gets lost in the process.  Conserve your mental and emotional energy. Each day, we have a certain amount of cognitive, emotional, and physical energy. Every decision, task, thought, and behavior withdraws energy. Once it’s gone, it’s gone for the day. Be deliberate about who or what receives that energy.  Focus on getting it right. When someone hurts or wrongs us, it is tempting to want to return the favor. Unfortunately, that does nothing to fix the situation and only frustrates you. What is your goal, and is what you’re doing getting you closer to reaching it?  Rather than react, ask yourself, “What does getting it right look like”?  When you have a difficult person in your life, remember to focus on what you control. And while it’s not always easy, give people the benefit of the doubt and assume positive intent. The truth is that we are all doing the best we can with the resources we have available. If someone could behave better in that moment, they would.  ----------------  Subscribe to the Anne Grady Group for more resilience-building tools and strategies! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU8s....  ----------------  Sign up for Anne's weekly Resilience Reset email list! 
https://www.annegradygroup.com/strong...  ----------------  More at https://www.annegradygroup.com​​​​​
▶︎ Instagram: @AnneGradyGroup
▶︎ Twitter: @AnneGradyGroup
▶︎ Facebook: Anne Grady Group
▶︎ New Book + Companion Journal: https://www.annegradygroup.com/books/...
Hurt people hurt people

We all know one. A person who just isn’t very nice or one that is perpetually difficult. This person can be a colleague, someone that works at your doctor’s office, or even a family member. (Truth bomb: If you don’t know this person, it could be you 😉).

Here’s the thing, most people don’t wake up and think, “I want to be difficult and unkind today”. We all want to be loved and to have a sense of belonging. It is a basic human need. No one aims to be disliked or excluded.

When people are rude, difficult, overbearing, or just plain mean, try to remember the following:

Hurt people hurt people. It’s not an excuse, but it is an explanation and one that allows us to see people through a lens of compassion instead of judgment. You can still be frustrated, you can create distance between yourself and this person, or can choose to not have them in your life.

We behave like the person we think we are. It is impossible to behave in a way that is inconsistent with the way we see ourselves. If someone has self-hatred or isn’t happy, they will behave that way toward others, often unintentionally. We have blindspots when it comes to our behavior, and often our intent gets lost in the process.

Conserve your mental and emotional energy. Each day, we have a certain amount of cognitive, emotional, and physical energy. Every decision, task, thought, and behavior withdraws energy. Once it’s gone, it’s gone for the day. Be deliberate about who or what receives that energy.

Focus on getting it right. When someone hurts or wrongs us, it is tempting to want to return the favor. Unfortunately, that does nothing to fix the situation and only frustrates you. What is your goal, and is what you’re doing getting you closer to reaching it? Rather than react, ask yourself, “What does getting it right look like”?

When you have a difficult person in your life, remember to focus on what you control. And while it’s not always easy, give people the benefit of the doubt and assume positive intent. The truth is that we are all doing the best we can with the resources we have available. If someone could behave better in that moment, they would.

----------------

Subscribe to the Anne Grady Group for more resilience-building tools and strategies! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU8s....

----------------

Sign up for Anne's weekly Resilience Reset email list!
https://www.annegradygroup.com/strong...

----------------

More at https://www.annegradygroup.com​​​​​
▶︎ Instagram: @AnneGradyGroup
▶︎ Twitter: @AnneGradyGroup
▶︎ Facebook: Anne Grady Group
▶︎ New Book + Companion Journal: https://www.annegradygroup.com/books/...

YouTube Video UExTZERTdG9fZ2VxQnF0bnBPUmNXMzMyZjRaRFdqdzdIYi4xNjIyNEE0MDEyRDlCMjBE

Hurt people hurt people

July 24, 2023 2:47 pm

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
9 hours ago

3️⃣ things you can do for your mental health #mentalhealthawarenessmonth ... See MoreSee Less

3️⃣ things you can do for your mental health #mentalhealthawarenessmonthImage attachmentImage attachment+2Image attachment
1 day ago

What is 1️⃣ small thing you can do today for yourself or someone else to make you feel good about yourself?

The little things we do to feel good about ourselves and others are the big things that determine our resilience and well-being. Do good things this week.
... See MoreSee Less

What is 1️⃣ small thing you can do today for yourself or someone else to make you feel good about yourself?  The little things we do to feel good about ourselves and others are the big things that determine our resilience and well-being. Do good things this week.
2 days ago

Just like it’s okay to take a sick day, it’s okay to take a sad day. Instead of taking time off to just binge Netflix, engage in activities that bring you joy. A mental break will build your resilience buffer zone. #MindfulMonday ... See MoreSee Less

Just like it’s okay to take a sick day, it’s okay to take a sad day. Instead of taking time off to just binge Netflix, engage in activities that bring you joy. A mental break will build your resilience buffer zone. #MindfulMonday

2 CommentsComment on Facebook

What a good idea.

Truth!

5 days ago

Reminder: We find what we look for. 👀

📷: Power of Positivity
... See MoreSee Less

Reminder: We find what we look for. 👀  📷: Power of Positivity
6 days ago

Thank you SUCCESS Magazine for including me on the judging panel for your most recent #womenofinfluence awards! Huge congrats to all the finalists. 👏 ... See MoreSee Less

Thank you SUCCESS Magazine for including me on the judging panel for your most recent #WomenOfInfluence awards! Huge congrats to all the finalists. 👏

9 CommentsComment on Facebook

How exciting! Congratulations! So well-deserved, Anne!!

Gorgeous pic!

Who were the finalist?

Congrats soooo well deserved!!!!

Atta girl!! You earned it, Anne!!

Bright smile!! You look lovely in green!

You are amazing I so appreciate your guidance!

Well deserved! 🙂

How exciting is that!👏Woo-hoo! 👍

View more comments

1 week ago

One of my favorite parts of my job is that I have the opportunity to speak to educators all over the country. One of their primary concerns across the board is mental health, both for students and themselves.

Prior to the pandemic, one in 5 adults and children struggled with a mental health issue. That number is now one in 4. Whether you have kids or are around them, this is the perfect time to have conversations about mental health.

When talking to kids about mental health, here are 5 ways to create a safe space for a conversation ⬇️
... See MoreSee Less

One of my favorite parts of my job is that I have the opportunity to speak to educators all over the country. One of their primary concerns across the board is mental health, both for students and themselves.  Prior to the pandemic, one in 5 adults and children struggled with a mental health issue. That number is now one in 4. Whether you have kids or are around them, this is the perfect time to have conversations about mental health.  When talking to kids about mental health, here are 5 ways to create a safe space for a conversation ⬇️
1 week ago

Practicing gratitude does not mean that you ignore the negative or wear rose-colored glasses. It simply means that you actively search for what is good.

80-95% of our thoughts are negative and repetitive. Our brain looks for the path of least resistance and negative thoughts are easier. Negative experiences are immediately stored in long-term memory.

Positive experiences require them to be held in awareness for several seconds to transfer from short to long-term storage. Since we rarely do this, many positive experiences flow straight through the brain. We spend a lot of time focusing on the negative, and repeated practice of any behavior becomes a habit. #MindfulMonday
... See MoreSee Less

Practicing gratitude does not mean that you ignore the negative or wear rose-colored glasses. It simply means that you actively search for what is good.  80-95% of our thoughts are negative and repetitive. Our brain looks for the path of least resistance and negative thoughts are easier. Negative experiences are immediately stored in long-term memory.  Positive experiences require them to be held in awareness for several seconds to transfer from short to long-term storage. Since we rarely do this, many positive experiences flow straight through the brain. We spend a lot of time focusing on the negative, and repeated practice of any behavior becomes a habit. #MindfulMonday

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Yes!

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